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Beauty and Cosmetics 1550-1950

Beauty and Cosmetics 1550-1950

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Add This - Beauty and Cosmetics 1550-1950

Written by Sarah DowningAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Sarah Downing

  • Format: Trade Paperback, 64 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Shire
  • On Sale: February 21, 2012
  • Price: $12.95
  • ISBN: 978-0-7478-0839-8 (0-7478-0839-2)
Also available as an eBook.
about this book

Exhibiting enormous power or inspiring incredible devotion, throughout history beauty has been women’s chief asset. Each age has required its own standard - a gleaming white brow during the Renaissance, the black eyebrows considered charming in the early 18th century, or the thin lips thought desirable to the Victorians. For those naturally blessed, their beauty could ensure a good marriage, offer social mobility, fame or notoriety whereas those without such obvious gifts would resort to any ends to achieve an illusion of beauty.

Ours is not the only age when beauty is celebrated but also judged and quantified. From the color of the ear to the transparency of the teeth the benchmark for every aspect of beauty has been set and women - and some men - have applied themselves wholeheartedly risking their lives using poisonous chemicals, their fortunes at the risk of blackmail, or the wrath of God, to reach the desired targets.

From Queen Elizabeth I who used dangerous quantities of white lead to give her complexion the illusion of a youthful luster, to Marilyn Monroe who blended 4 shades of lipstick to emphasize her perfect pout this book will examine some of the more unusual cosmetic practices contemplated in beauty's name.