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Arguing about Slavery

Arguing about Slavery

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Add This - Arguing about Slavery

Written by William Lee MillerAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by William Lee Miller

  • Format: Trade Paperback, 592 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Vintage
  • On Sale: January 12, 1998
  • Price: $17.95
  • ISBN: 978-0-679-76844-9 (0-679-76844-0)
about this book

In the 1830s slavery was so deeply entrenched that it could not even be discussed in Congress, which had enacted a "gag rule" to ensure that anti-slavery petitions would be summarily rejected. This stirring book chronicles the parliamentary battle to bring "the peculiar institution" into the national debate, a battle that some historians have called "the Pearl Harbor of the slavery controversy." The campaign to make slavery officially and respectably debatable was waged by John Quincy Adams who spent nine years defying gags, accusations of treason, and assassination threats. In the end, he made his case through a combination of cunning and sheer endurance. Telling this story with a brilliant command of detail, Arguing About Slavery endows history with majestic sweep, heroism, and moral weight.

"Dramatic, immediate, intensely readable, fascinating and often moving."--New York Times Book Review