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The Cabin

The Cabin

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Add This - The Cabin

Written by David MametAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by David Mamet

  • Format: Trade Paperback, 176 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Vintage
  • On Sale: November 30, 1993
  • Price: $12.00
  • ISBN: 978-0-679-74720-8 (0-679-74720-6)
Also available as an eBook.
about this book

In these mordant, elegant, and often disquieting essays, the internationally acclaimed dramatist creates a sort of autobiography by strobe light, one that is both mysterious and starkly revealing.The pieces in The Cabin are about places and things: the suburbs of Chicago, where as a boy David Mamet helplessly watched his stepfather terrorize his sister; New York City, where as a young man he had to eat his way through a mountain of fried matzoh to earn a night of sexual bliss. They are about guns, campaign buttons, and a cabin in the Vermont woods that stinks of wood smoke and kerosene — and about their associations of pleasure, menace, and regret.The resulting volume may be compared to the plays that have made Mamet famous: it is finely crafted and deftly timed, and its precise language carries an enormous weight of feeling.

"Enormous powers of observation...he has an ear for language."—LA Weekly

"A very worthwhile collection...Mamet walks a line between provocation and enticement, and its precariousness almost always compels attention."—Newsday

"A delight...there is a lean, masculine quality to his essays."—Baltimore Sun