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The Woman in the Dunes

The Woman in the Dunes

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Add This - The Woman in the Dunes

Written by Kobo AbeAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Kobo Abe

  • Format: Trade Paperback, 256 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Vintage
  • On Sale: April 16, 1991
  • Price: $15.00
  • ISBN: 978-0-679-73378-2 (0-679-73378-7)
Also available as an eBook.
about this book

One of the premier Japanese novels of the 20th century, The Woman in the Dunes combines the essence of myth, suspense, and the existential novel. In a remote seaside village, Niki Jumpei, a teacher and amateur entomologist, is held captive with a young woman at the bottom of a vast sand pit where, Sisyphus-like, they are pressed into shoveling off the ever-advancing sand dunes that threaten the village. Translated from the Japanese by E. Dale Saunders.

"Abe follows with meticulous precision his hero's constantly shifting physical, emotional and psychological states. He also presents...everyday existence in a sand pit with such compelling realism that these passages serve both to heighten the credibility of the bizarre plot and subtly increases the interior tensions of the novel." —The New York Times Book Review

“One of the maddest books I’ve ever loved.” —Junot Diaz, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao