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Crossing Open Ground

Crossing Open Ground

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Add This - Crossing Open Ground

Written by Barry LopezAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Barry Lopez

  • Format: Trade Paperback, 224 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Vintage
  • On Sale: May 14, 1989
  • Price: $15.00
  • ISBN: 978-0-679-72183-3 (0-679-72183-5)
about this book


Barry Lopez, winner of the 1996 American Book Award for Arctic Dreams, weaves the same invigorating spell in Crossing Open Ground as he travels through the American Southwest and Alaska, discussing endangered wildlife and forgotten cultures. Through his crystalline vision, Lopez urges us toward a new attitude, a re-enchantment with the world that is vital to our sense of place, our well-being...our very survival.

"Lopez looks at flocks of geese, and bull riders, and the tracks of Arctic fox in the snow, and then he tells us about ourselves. He restores to us the name for what it is we want." — Philadelphia Inquirer

"Barry Lopez is the best nature writer of our decade, repeatedly reminding us of the ages-old ties between the wild places and humanity." —Sacramento Bee

"He makes the reader at home with himself and the world. Anyone who has ever felt lost should read this book."—San Francisco Chronicle