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Paradise

Paradise

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Add This - Paradise

Written by DanteAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Dante
Illustrated by Gustave DoreAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Gustave Dore
Translated by Anthony EsolenAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Anthony Esolen

  • Format: Hardcover, 544 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Modern Library
  • On Sale: November 2, 2004
  • Price: $27.95
  • ISBN: 978-0-679-64269-5 (0-679-64269-2)
Also available as an eBook and a trade paperback.
about this book

The Divine Comedy is a complete scale of the depths and heights of human emotion," wrote T.S. Eliot. "The last canto of the Paradiso is to my thinking the highest point that poetry has ever reached or ever can reach."

The Divine Comedy stands as one of the towering creations of world literature, and its climactic section, the Paradiso, is perhaps the most ambitious poetic attempt ever made to represent the merging of individual destiny with universal order. Having passed through Hell and Purgatory, Dante is led by his beloved Beatrice to the upper sphere of Paradise, wherein lie the sublime truths of Divine will and eternal salvation, to at last experience a rapturous vision of God.

"A spectacular achievement," said poet and critic Archibald MacLeish of John Ciardi's version of Dante's masterpiece. "A text with the clarity and sobriety of a first-rate prose translation which at the same time suggests in powerful and unmistakable ways the run and rhythm of the great original."