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Ordinary Daylight

Ordinary Daylight

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Add This - Ordinary Daylight

Written by Andrew PotokAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Andrew Potok

  • Format: Trade Paperback, 320 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Bantam
  • On Sale: February 4, 2003
  • Price: $11.95
  • ISBN: 978-0-553-38198-6 (0-553-38198-9)
Also available as an eBook.
about this book

Andrew Potok is an intense, vigorous, sensual man--and a gifted painter. Then, passing forty, he rapidly begins to go blind from an inherited eye disease, retinitis pigmentosa. Depressed and angry, he rages at the losses that are eradicating his life as an artist, his sources of pleasure, his competence as a man. He hates himself for becoming blind. But as he will ultimately discover, and as this remarkable memoir recounts, it is not the end of the world. It is the beginning.

Ordinary Daylight

This the story of Potok’s remarkable odyssey out of despair. He attempts to come to terms with his condition: learning skills for the newly blind, dealing with freakish encounters with the medical establishment, going to London for a promised cure through a bizarre and painful “therapy” of bee stings. He wrestles with the anguish of knowing that his daughter has inherited the same disease that is stealing his own eyesight. And then, as he edges ever closer to complete blindness, there comes the day when he recognizes that the exhilaration he once found in the mix of paint and canvas, hand and eye, he has begun to find in words.

By turns fierce, blunt, sexy, and uproariously funny, Andrew Potok’s memoir of his journey is as shatteringly frank as it is triumphant.