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When Women Stop Hating Their Bodies

When Women Stop Hating Their Bodies

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Written by Jane R. HirschmannAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Jane R. Hirschmann

  • Format: Trade Paperback, 384 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Ballantine Books
  • On Sale: December 30, 1996
  • Price: $14.95
  • ISBN: 978-0-449-91058-0 (0-449-91058-X)
Also available as an eBook.
about this book

"Will empower all women to stop believing that our bodies are the problems, dieting the solution." —Harriet Lerner, Ph.D., author of The Dance of Anger

In this revolutionary new book, bestselling authors Carol Munter and Jane Hirschmann explore the myriad reasons why women cling to diets despite overwhelming evidence that diets don't work. In fact, diets turn us into compulsive eaters who are obsessed with food and weight.

Munter and Hirschmann call this syndrome "Bad Body Fever" and demonstrate how "bad body thoughts" are clues to our emotional lives. They explore the difficulties women encounter replacing dieting with demand feeding. And finally, they teach us how to think about our problems rather than eat about them—so that food can resume its proper place in our lives.

"Many women will find in these pages exactly what they need: determined, optimistic, and resourceful coaches, pausing at the right moments to acknowledge the difficulty of change, then passionately urging them to press on." —Susan C. Wooley, Ph.D., professor of Psychology, codirector—Eating Disorders Center, University of Cincinnati Medical Center