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No Heroes, No Villains

No Heroes, No Villains

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Add This - No Heroes, No Villains

Written by Steven J. PhillipsAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Steven J. Phillips

  • Format: Trade Paperback, 256 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Vintage
  • On Sale: February 12, 1978
  • Price: $13.00
  • ISBN: 978-0-394-72531-4 (0-394-72531-X)
Also available as an eBook.
about this book

On June 28, 1972 in a South Bronx subway station, John Skagen, a white off-duty policeman on his way home, suddenly and without apparent provocation, ordered James Richardson, a black man on his way to work, to get against the wall and put his hands up. Richardson had a gun, and the two exchanged shots. In the melee that followed, Skagen was fatally wounded by a cop who rushed to the scene. In the ensuing trial, William Kunstler handled Richardson's defense and the author of this book, then assistant district attorney, prosecuted the case. Here is a first-hand, behind-the-scenes account of every step of the proceedings.



“The finest and simplest explanation of the process of criminal law and its practice that I have ever read. Plea bargaining, the process of jury selection, summations, the entire jury process has perhaps never been as successfully and simply described.”—The New York Times