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The Whole Woman

The Whole Woman

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Add This - The Whole Woman

Written by Germaine GreerAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Germaine Greer

  • Format: Trade Paperback, 384 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Anchor
  • On Sale: August 8, 2000
  • Price: $18.00
  • ISBN: 978-0-385-72003-8 (0-385-72003-3)
Also available as an eBook.
about this book

Thirty years after The Female Eunuch galvanized the women's liberation movement, Germaine Greer launches a fiery sequel assessing the state of womanhood and proclaiming that the time has come to get angry again.

With passionate rhetoric, unique authority, and outrageous humor, The Whole Woman reveals how women have been sideswiped and sidetracked in the quest for liberation, duped into settling for an ersatz equality. Greer argues that women have come a long way in the past three decades, but that innumerable forms of insidious discrimination and exploitation persist in every area of life--from the care of the body to the care of the household, from the workplace to the marketplace. She startles us with her demonstration that the oft-repeated claim that "women can have it all" is merely a pacifying illusion--that things are getting worse, and that action is necessary now.

The Whole Woman is a shattering critique of the complacency and denial that have replaced feminist determination and militancy, and of a society that has done little to maintain the momentum for change. It is also a call to arms--forceful and impossible to ignore.