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New Grub Street

New Grub Street

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Add This - New Grub Street

Written by George GissingAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by George Gissing
Introduction by Francine ProseAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Francine Prose

  • Format: Trade Paperback, 544 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Modern Library
  • On Sale: November 12, 2002
  • Price: $16.00
  • ISBN: 978-0-375-76110-2 (0-375-76110-1)
Also available as an eBook.
about this book

Hailed as Gissing’s finest novel, New Grub Street portrays the intrigues and hardships of the publishing world in late Victorian England. In a materialistic, class-conscious society that rewards commercial savvy over artistic achievement, authors and scholars struggle to earn a living without compromising their standards. “Even as the novel chills us with its still-recognizable portrayal of the crass and vulgar world of literary endeavor,” writes Francine Prose in her Introduction, “its very existence provides eloquent, encouraging proof of the fact that a powerful, honest writer can transcend the constraints of commerce.”

This Modern Library Paperback Classic is set from the text of the 1891 first edition.


“The most impressive of Gissing’s books . . . England has produced very few better novelists.” —George Orwell