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The Island of Dr. Moreau

The Island of Dr. Moreau

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Add This - The Island of Dr. Moreau

Written by H.G. WellsAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by H.G. Wells
Foreword by Peter StraubAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Peter Straub

  • Format: Trade Paperback, 240 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Modern Library
  • On Sale: May 14, 2002
  • Price: $8.95
  • ISBN: 978-0-375-76096-9 (0-375-76096-2)
Also available as an eBook and a paperback.
about this book

Written in 1896, The Island of Dr. Moreau is one of the earliest scientific romances. An instant sensation, it was meant as a commentary on Darwin’s theory of evolution, which H. G. Wells stoutly believed. The story centers on the depraved Dr. Moreau, who conducts unspeakable animal experiments on a remote tropical island, with hideous, humanlike results. Edward Prendick, an English-man whose misfortunes bring him to the island, is witness to the Beast Folk’s strange civilization and their eventual terrifying regression. While gene-splicing and bioengineering are common practices today, readers are still astounded at Wells’s haunting vision and the ethical questions he raised a century before our time.