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Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

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Add This - Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

Written by Mark TwainAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Mark Twain
Introduction by George SaundersAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by George Saunders

  • Format: Trade Paperback, 304 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Modern Library
  • On Sale: August 14, 2001
  • Price: $7.00
  • ISBN: 978-0-375-75737-2 (0-375-75737-6)
about this book

“All modern American literature comes from one book by Mark Twain called Huckleberry Finn,” Ernest Hemingway wrote. “It’s the best book we’ve had.” A complex masterpiece that has spawned volumes of scholarly exegesis and interpretative theories, it is at heart a compelling adventure story. Huck, in flight from his murderous father, and Nigger Jim, in flight from slavery, pilot their raft thrillingly through treacherous waters, surviving a crash with a steamboat, betrayal by rogues, and the final threat from the bourgeoisie. Informing all this is the presence of the River, described in palpable detail by Mark Twain, the former steamboat pilot, who transforms it into a richly metaphoric entity. Twain’s other great innovation was the language of the book itself, which is expressive in a completely original way. “The invention of this language, with all its implications, gave a new dimension to our literature,” Robert Penn Warren noted. “It is a language capable of poetry.”

This Modern Library Paperback Classics edition includes an introduction by George Saunders, a note on the text and commentary by Thomas Perry Sergeant, Bernard DeVoto, Clifton Fadiman, T.S. Eliot, and Leo Marx.