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The Way We Live Now

The Way We Live Now

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Add This - The Way We Live Now

Written by Anthony TrollopeAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Anthony Trollope
Introduction by David BrooksAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by David Brooks

  • Format: Trade Paperback, 896 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Modern Library
  • On Sale: August 14, 2001
  • Price: $14.00
  • ISBN: 978-0-375-75731-0 (0-375-75731-7)
Also available as an eBook.
about this book

'Trollope did not write for posterity,' observed Henry James. 'He wrote for the day, the moment; but these are just the writers whom posterity is apt to put into its pocket.' Considered by contemporary critics to be Trollope's greatest novel, The Way We Live Now is a satire of the literary world of London in the 1870s and a bold indictment of the new power of speculative finance in English life. 'I was instigated by what I conceived to be the commercial profligacy of the age,' Trollope said.

His story concerns Augustus Melmotte, a French swindler and scoundrel, and his daughter, to whom Felix Carbury, adored son of the authoress Lady Carbury, is induced to propose marriage for the sake of securing a fortune. Trollope knew well the difficulties of dealing with editors, publishers, reviewers, and the public; his portrait of Lady Carbury, impetuous, unprincipled, and unswervingly devoted to her own self-promotion, is one of his finest satirical achievements.

His picture of late-nineteenth-century England is a portrait of a society on the verge of moral bankruptcy. In The Way We Live Now Trollope combines his talents as a portraitist and his skills as a storyteller to give us life as it was lived more than a hundred years ago.

"The Way We Live Now is the essence of Trollope. If he had written no other novel, it would have ensured his immortality."