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Tess of the d'Urbervilles

Tess of the d'Urbervilles

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Add This - Tess of the d'Urbervilles

Written by Thomas HardyAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Thomas Hardy
Introduction by James WoodAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by James Wood

  • Format: Trade Paperback, 544 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Modern Library
  • On Sale: February 13, 2001
  • Price: $10.00
  • ISBN: 978-0-375-75679-5 (0-375-75679-5)
Also available as an eBook, eBook and a paperback.
about this book

Etched against the background of a dying rural society, Tess of the d’Urbervilles was Thomas Hardy’s “bestseller,” and Tess Durbeyfield remains his most striking and tragic heroine. Of all the characters he created, she meant the most to him. Hopelessly torn between two men—Alec d’Urberville, a wealthy, dissolute young man who seduces her in a lonely wood, and Angel Clare, her provincial, moralistic, and unforgiving husband—Tess escapes from her vise of passion through a horrible, desperate act.

“Like the greatest characters in literature, Tess lives beyond the final pages of the book as a permanent citizen of the imagination,” said Irving Howe. “In Tess he stakes everything on his sensuous apprehension of a young woman's life, a girl who is at once a simple milkmaid and an archetype of feminine strength. . . . Tess is that rare creature in literature: goodness made interesting.”