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True History of the Kelly Gang

True History of the Kelly Gang

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Written by Peter CareyAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Peter Carey

  • Format: Trade Paperback, 384 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Vintage
  • On Sale: December 4, 2001
  • Price: $15.95
  • ISBN: 978-0-375-72467-1 (0-375-72467-2)
Also available as an eBook.
about this book

Winner of the 2001 Booker Prize

Out of nineteenth-century Australia rides a hero of his people and a man for all nations, in this masterpiece by the Booker Prize-winning author of Oscar and Lucinda and Jack Maggs. Exhilarating, hilarious, panoramic, and immediately engrossing, it is also—at a distance of many thousand miles and more than a century—a Great American Novel.

This is Ned Kelly’s true confession, in his own words and written on the run for an infant daughter he has never seen. To the authorities, this son of dirt-poor Irish immigrants was a born thief and, ultimately, a cold-blooded murderer; to most other Australians, he was a scapegoat and patriot persecuted by “English” landlords and their agents.

With his brothers and two friends, Kelly eluded a massive police manhunt for twenty months, living by his wits and strong heart, supplementing his bushwhacking skills with ingenious bank robberies while enjoying the support of most everyone not in uniform. He declined to flee overseas when he could, bound to win his jailed mother's freedom by any means possible, including his own surrender. In the end, however, she served out her sentence in the same Melbourne prison where, in 1880, her son was hanged.

Still his country’s most powerful legend, Ned Kelly is here chiefly a man in full: devoted son, loving husband, fretful father, and loyal friend, now speaking as if from the grave. With this mythic outlaw and the story of his mighty travails and exploits, and with all the force of a classic Western, Peter Carey has breathed life into a historical figure who transcends all borders and embodies tragedy, perseverance, and freedom.

“The ingenuity, empathy, and poetic ear that the novelist brings to his feat of imposture cannot be rated too high.”–John Updike, The New Yorker

“Carey succeeds in creating an account that not only feels authentic but also passes as a serious novel and solid, old-fashioned ‘entertainment.’ A big, meaty novel, blending Dickens and Cormac McCarthy with a distinctly Australian strain of melancholy.”–San Francisco Chronicle

“Abravura performance…. Rewards the persistent reader with a powerful emotional experience.”–The Wall Street Journal

“Carey’s pen writes with an ink that is two parts archaic and one part modern and colors a prose that rocks and cajoles the reader into a certainty that Ned Kelly is fit company not only for Jack Palance and Clint Eastwood but for Thomas Jefferson and perhaps even a bodhisattva.”–Los Angeles Times

“This novel is worth our best attention.”–The Washington Post Book World

“An avalanche of a novel…. Cary has raised a national legend to the level of an international myth.”–Christian Science Monitor