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A Blind Man Can See How Much I Love You

A Blind Man Can See How Much I Love You

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Add This - A Blind Man Can See How Much I Love You

Written by Amy BloomAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Amy Bloom

  • Format: Trade Paperback, 176 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Vintage
  • On Sale: July 31, 2001
  • Price: $13.95
  • ISBN: 978-0-375-70557-1 (0-375-70557-0)
Also available as an eBook.
about this book

Amy Bloom was nominated for a National Book Award for her first collection, Come to Me, and her fiction has appeared in The New Yorker, Story, Antaeus, and other magazines, and in The Best American Short Stories and Prize Stories: The O. Henry Awards. In her new collection, she enhances her reputation as a true artist of the form.

Here are characters confronted with tragedy, perplexed by emotions, and challenged to endure whatever modern life may have in store. A loving mother accompanies her daughter in her journey to become a man, and discovers a new, hopeful love. A stepmother and stepson meet again after fifteen years and a devastating mistake, and rediscover their familial affection for each other. And in "The Story," a widow bent on seducing another woman's husband constructs and deconstructs her story until she has "made the best and happiest ending" possible "in this world."

“Exotic intimacies color [these] sharply wrought stories…. Ms. Bloom writes warmly and astutely, with arresting precision.”–The New York Times

“With consummate skill and good grace, Bloom shows how people are capable of almost anything, and why.”–San Francisco Chronicle

“Beautiful.... Bloom is a deft observer and penetrating chronicler of life’s dramas.”–The Miami Herald