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The Souls of Black Folk

The Souls of Black Folk

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Written by W.E.B. Du BoisAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by W.E.B. Du Bois
Introduction by David L. LewisAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by David L. Lewis

  • Format: Hardcover, 320 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Modern Library
  • On Sale: January 7, 2003
  • Price: $17.95
  • ISBN: 978-0-375-50911-7 (0-375-50911-9)
Also available as an eBook, eBook and a paperback.
about this book

When first published in 1903, W.E.B. Du Bois’s The Souls of Black Folk struck like a thunderclap, quickly establishing itself as a work that wholly redefined the history of the black experience in America, introducing the now famous “problem of the color line.” In decades since, its stature has only grown, and today it ranks as one of the most influential and resonant works in the history of American thought.

This centennial edition contains a landmark Introduction by historian David Levering Lewis that brilliantly demonstrates how The Souls of Black Folk remains indispensable not only to an understanding of the history of race and democracy in America but to considerations of the future of racial and cultural comity in the twenty-first century.


“One hundred years after publication, there is in the entire body of social criticism still no more than a handful of meditations on the promise and failings of democracy in America to rival William Edward Burghardt Du Bois’s extraordinary collection of fourteen essays.” —from the Introduction by David Levering Lewis