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Black Hole

Black Hole

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Add This - Black Hole

Written by Charles BurnsAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Charles Burns

  • Format: Hardcover
  •  
  • Publisher: Pantheon
  • On Sale: October 18, 2005
  • Price: $32.50
  • ISBN: 978-0-375-42380-2 (0-375-42380-X)
Also available as a trade paperback.
about this book

Suburban Seattle, the mid-1970s. We learn from the out-set that a strange plague has descended upon the area’s teenagers, transmitted by sexual contact. The disease is manifested in any number of ways — from the hideously grotesque to the subtle (and concealable) — but once you’ve got it, that’s it. There’s no turning back.

As we inhabit the heads of several key characters — some kids who have it, some who don’t, some who are about to get it — what unfolds isn’t the expected battle to fight the plague, or bring heightened awareness to it , or even to treat it. What we become witness to instead is a fascinating and eerie portrait of the nature of high school alienation itself — the savagery, the cruelty, the relentless anxiety and ennui, the longing for escape.

And then the murders start.

As hypnotically beautiful as it is horrifying, Black Hole transcends its genre by deftly exploring a specific American cultural moment in flux and the kids who are caught in it.