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A Night in Brooklyn

A Night in Brooklyn

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Add This - A Night in Brooklyn

Written by D. NurkseAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by D. Nurkse

  • Format: Hardcover, 96 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Knopf
  • On Sale: July 10, 2012
  • Price: $26.00
  • ISBN: 978-0-307-95932-4 (0-307-95932-5)
Also available as an eBook.
about this book

D. Nurkse’s deeply satisfying new collection is a haunted love letter to the far corners of his hometown, Brooklyn, New York, and a meditation on the selves that were left behind in those indelible places.

Here Nurkse brings alive the particular details that shape a life, in this case unique to the world of Brooklyn—a job at the Arnold Grill, “topping off drafts with a paddle” for the truckers who came in; the deaf white alley cat that mysteriously survived the winter on a stoop in Bensonhurst; the narrow bed where young love took place; the wild gardens behind the tenements. His exploration of this almost mythic city past is combined with a sense of the future speeding toward us—the ongoing riddle of time and being in a larger universe.

. . . And she who was driving said,
We know the coming disaster intimately but the present is unknowable.

Which disaster, I wondered, sexual or geological? But I was shy:
her beauty was like a language she didn’t speak and had never heard.

From “The Present”