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Daughters of the Revolution

Daughters of the Revolution

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Add This - Daughters of the Revolution

Written by Carolyn CookeAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Carolyn Cooke

  • Format: Hardcover, 192 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Knopf
  • On Sale: June 7, 2011
  • Price: $24.95
  • ISBN: 978-0-307-59473-0 (0-307-59473-4)
Also available as an eBook and a trade paperback.
about this book

From the O. Henry Award–winning author of the story collection The Bostons—a New York Times Notable Book, Los Angeles Times Book of the Year and winner of the PEN/Robert Bingham Fellowship for Writers—an exquisite first novel set at a disintegrating New England prep school.

It’s 1968. The prestigious but cash-strapped Goode School in the town of Cape Wilde is run by its aging, philandering headmaster, Goddard Byrd, known to both his friends and his enemies as God. With Cape Wilde engulfed by the social and political storms of integration, coeducation and the sexual revolution, God has confidently promised coeducation “over my dead body.” And then, through a clerical error, the Goode School admits its first female student: Carole Faust, a brilliant, intractable fifteen-year-old black girl.

What does it mean to be the First Girl?

Carolyn Cooke has written a ferociously intelligent, richly sensual novel about the lives of girls and women, the complicated desperation of daughters without fathers and the erosion of paternalistic power in an elite New England town on the cusp of radical social change. Remarkable for the precision of its language, the incandescence of its images, and the sly provocations of its moral and emotional predicaments, Daughters of the Revolution is a novel of exceptional force and beauty.

“So smart, so visceral, so sexy . . . Absolutely brilliant.” —Kate Walbert, author of A Short History of Women