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How We Lead

How We Lead

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Written by Joe ClarkAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Joe Clark

  • Format: Hardcover, 288 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Random House Canada
  • On Sale: November 5, 2013
  • Price: $32.00
  • ISBN: 978-0-307-35907-0 (0-307-35907-7)
Also available as an eBook and a trade paperback.
about this book

A passionate argument for Canada’s reassertion of its place on the world stage, from a former prime minister and one of Canada’s most respected political figures.

In the world that is taking shape, the unique combination of Canada’s success at home as a diverse society and its reputation internationally as a sympathetic and respected partner constitute national assets that are at least as valuable as its natural resource wealth. As the world becomes more competitive and complex, and the chances of deadly conflict grow, the example and the initiative of Canada can become more important than they have ever been. That depends on its people: assets have no value if Canadians don’t recognize or use them, or worse, if they waste them.

A more effective Canada is not only a benefit to itself, but to its friends and neighbors. And in this compelling examination of what it as a nation has been, what it has become and what it can yet be to the world, Joe Clark takes the reader beyond formal foreign policy and looks at the contributions and leadership offered by Canada’s most successful individuals and organizations who are already putting these uniquely Canadian assets to work internationally.