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Nation Maker

Nation Maker

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Add This - Nation Maker

Written by Richard J. GwynAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Richard J. Gwyn

  • Format: Hardcover, 688 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Random House Canada
  • On Sale: September 27, 2011
  • Price: $37.00
  • ISBN: 978-0-307-35644-4 (0-307-35644-2)
Also available as an eBook and a trade paperback.
about this book

An exciting story, passionately told and rich in detail, this major biography is the second volume of the bestselling, award-winning John A: The Man Who Made Us, by well-known journalist and highly respected author Richard Gwyn.

John A. Macdonald, Canada’s first and most important prime minister, is the man who made Confederation happen, who built the country over the next quarter century, and who shaped what it is today. From Confederation Day in 1867, where this volume picks up, Macdonald finessed a reluctant union of four provinces in central and eastern Canada into a strong nation, despite indifference from Britain and annexationist sentiment in the United States.

But it wasn’t easy. The wily Macdonald faced constant crises throughout these years, from Louis Riel’s two rebellions through to the Pacific Scandal that almost undid his government and his quest to find the spine of the nation: the railroad that would link east to west. Gwyn paints a superb portrait of Canada and its leaders through these formative years and also delves deep to show us Macdonald the man, as he marries for the second time, deals with the birth of a disabled child, and the assassination of his close friend Darcy McGee, and wrestles with whether Riel should hang.

Indelibly, Gwyn shows us Macdonald’s love of Canada and his ability to joust with forces who would have been just as happy to see the end of Canada before it had really begun.

“Charming, difficult, far-sighted, devious, Sir John A. Macdonald was a master politician who spoke to Canadians in a way that few others have ever done. Writing with his usual elegance and insight, Richard Gwyn has done full justice to the man whose own story is inextricably interwoven with that of Canada.” –Margaret MacMillan, author of Paris 1919