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The Utility of Force

The Utility of Force

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Add This - The Utility of Force

Written by Rupert SmithAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Rupert Smith

  • Format: Trade Paperback, 448 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Vintage
  • On Sale: February 12, 2008
  • Price: $17.00
  • ISBN: 978-0-307-27811-1 (0-307-27811-5)
Also available as an eBook.
about this book

From a highly decorated general, a brilliant new way of understanding war and its role in the twenty-first century.

Drawing on his vast experience as a commander during the first Gulf War, and in Bosnia, Kosovo, and Northern Ireland, General Rupert Smith gives us a probing analysis of modern war. He demonstrates why today’s conflicts must be understood as intertwined political and military events, and makes clear why the current model of total war has failed in Iraq, Afghanistan, and other recent campaigns. Smith offers a compelling contemporary vision for how to secure our world and the consequences of ignoring the new, shifting face of war.

“One of the most important books on modern warfare in the last decade. We would be better off if the United States had a few more generals like him.” —The Washington Post Book World

“An impressive and absorbing work of military analysis. . . . Smith is the Clausewitz of low-intensity conflict and peacekeeping operations. . . . He brilliantly lays bare the newfound limits of Western military power.” —The New York Times Book Review

“It is hard to overstate the devastating nature of this book as an indictment of almost everything the West has done in recent years, and is doing today.” —The Sunday Telegraph

“A closely argued, searching textbook on strategy and the efficient use of military power in the post-Cold War era.”—The New York Times

“A book that will assure [Smith's] reputation as a serious and original thinker among soldiers and strategists.” —John Keegan, The Daily Telegraph

“It is hard to overstate the devastating nature of this books as an indictment of almost everything the West has done in recent years, and is doing today.” —Max Hastings, The Sunday Telegraph

“A work of exceptional clarity and depth that ought to set the agenda for the next transformation in how armed power is used and even why.” —Philip Bobbitt

"Smith has written one of the most important books on modern warfare in the last decade. We would be better off if the United States had a few more generals like him."—Eliot A. Cohen, The Washington Post Book World

"An impressive and absorbing work of military analysis . . . If, in the end, he does not quite solve the riddle of how to win the small wars of our time, he brilliantly lays bare the newfound limits of Western military power. The more Iraq looks like Bosnia on the Tigris . . . the more prescient his book will seem."—Niall Ferguson, The New York Times Book Review

"Rupert Smith's The Utility of Force remains the seminal work on this subject. While others have added invaluable data . . . they fail to understand as Smith does that we live in a new era."—Stephen Graubard, Financial Times