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The Great Inversion and the Future of the American City

The Great Inversion and the Future of the American City

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Add This - The Great Inversion and the Future of the American City

Written by Alan EhrenhaltAuthor Alerts:  Random House will alert you to new works by Alan Ehrenhalt

  • Format: Hardcover, 288 pages
  •  
  • Publisher: Knopf
  • On Sale: April 24, 2012
  • Price: $26.95
  • ISBN: 978-0-307-27274-4 (0-307-27274-5)
Also available as an eBook and a trade paperback.
about this book

In The Great Inversion and the Future of the American City we travel the nation with Alan Ehrenhalt, one of our leading urbanists, as he explains how America’s cities are changing, what makes them succeed or fail, and what this means for our future.

Just a couple of decades ago, we took it for granted that inner cities were the preserve of immigrants and the poor, and that suburbs were the chosen destination of those who could afford them. Today, a demographic inversion is taking place: Central cities increasingly are where the affluent want to live, while suburbs are becoming home to poorer people and those who come to America from other parts of the world. Highly educated members of the emerging millennial generation are showing a decided preference for urban life and are being joined in many places by a new class of affluent retirees.

Ehrenhalt shows us how the commercial canyons of lower Manhattan are becoming residential neighborhoods, and how mass transit has revitalized inner-city communities in Chicago and Brooklyn. He explains why car-dominated cities like Phoenix and Charlotte have sought to build twenty-first-century downtowns from scratch, while sprawling postwar suburbs are seeking to attract young people with their own form of urbanized experience.
The Great Inversion is an eye-opening and thoroughly engaging look at our urban society and its future.

“The future of the city is the future of America and the world. Alan Ehrenhalt shows us how a desire for urbanism is bringing people back to America’s downtowns, and what suburbs and communities of all sorts must do to thrive in the future. The Great Inversion is a must read for anyone concerned with American cities, urbanism, and the future of the way we live.” —Richard Florida, author of Who’s Your City?

“Most writers on cities are either cheerleaders or naysayers. Ehrenhalt is neither, and he has written a balanced, hard-hitting book that is a persuasive forecast of our complex urban future.” —Witold Rybczynski, author of Makeshift Metropolis

“Ehrenhalt takes his reader on a tour of the changing American cityscape. . . . An enjoyable and engaging read, especially for those considering a move back to the city. . . . Solidly researched with great questions asked and plenty of hard facts and anecdotal answers provided.” —Richard Horan, Christian Science Monitor

The Great Inversion and the United Nations agree; the world is becoming more urban by the day. . . . To Ehrenhalt’s credit, he does not pass moral judgment on the process. With clear prose that is both informative and entertaining, he objectively states the facts (and presents a great number of voices from immigrant businessmen and local civil servants to politicians from Elite African-American families and developers), leaving his readers free to render their own verdict.” —Joshua Bloodworth, Dominion of New York