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Sherwood Anderson

  • About this Author
author spotlight

Sherwood Anderson (1876-1941) spent most of his boyhood in Clyde, Ohio, the model for Winesburg, Ohio. And like the central figure of that work, Anderson left small-town life behind after his mother’s death, when he was nineteen. After serving in the Spanish-American War, the mostly self-taught Anderson became successful advertising copywriter in Chicago. Then in 1912, torn between his responsibilities and his drive to create, he had a breakdown that has become legendary. Having become the owner of a small factory, Anderson abruptly walked from his office and wandered about for four days in a trancelike state before ending up in an Ohio hospital. Realizing he must devote his life to writing, he finally broke with his wife and family and joined Carl Sandburg and Theodore Dreiser, who were at the core of Chicago’s literary group. By 1925, Anderson had demonstrated such talent that H.L. Mencken called him “America’s most distinguished novelist.” A mentor of William Faulkner and Thomas Wolfe, Anderson was known for his colloquial style and his exploration of gender and sexuality in relationships. His works of fiction include Windy McPherson’s Son (1916); Poor White (1920); The Triumph of the Egg (1921), a short-story collection; and Dark Laughter (1925). Also important are his autobiographical works: A Story Teller’s Story (1924), Tar: A Midwest Childhood (1926), and Sherwood Anderson’s Memoirs (1942). He died of peritonitis on a trip abroad when a broken toothpick perforated his intestines.

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Exam Copy
Winesburg, Ohio

Written by Sherwood Anderson
Introduction by John Updike


Format: Trade Paperback, 272 pages
Publisher: Modern Library
On Sale: March 2, 1999
Price: $8.95

Before Raymond Carver, John Cheever, and Richard Ford, there was Sherwood Anderson, who, with Winesburg, Ohio, charted a new direction in American fiction--evoking with lyrical simplicity quiet moments of epiphany in the lives of ordinary men and women. In a bed, elevated so that he can peer out the window, an... Read more >
Also available as an eBook, eBook and a paperback.

Exam Copy
Winesburg, Ohio

Written by Sherwood Anderson


Format: Paperback, 256 pages
Publisher: Bantam Classics
On Sale: March 1, 1995
Price: $5.95

Sherwood Anderson's timeless cycle of loosely connected tales--in which a young reporter named George Willard probes the hopes, dreams, and fears of the solitary people in a small Midwestern town at the turn of the century--embraced a new frankness and realism that ushered American literature into the modern age. Read more >
Also available as an eBook, eBook and a trade paperback.

Winesburg, Ohio

Written by Sherwood Anderson


Format: eBook
Publisher: Bantam Classics
On Sale: June 24, 2008
Price: $1.99

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Also available as an eBook, paperback and a trade paperback.

Winesburg, Ohio
(A Modern Library E-Book)
Written by Sherwood Anderson


Format: eBook
Publisher: Modern Library
On Sale: November 1, 2000
Price: $7.99

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Also available as an eBook, paperback and a trade paperback.
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